The Hairy Fairy
Lord knows the Democratic Party is far from perfect. But House Democrats, when they were in the majority, at least understood that the government had to function, even if its policies were not those they preferred. When Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was speaker, for example, she made certain that bills funding the occupation of Iraq made it through the House, even though a majority of Democrats bitterly opposed the war.

Today’s Republican Party opposes the Affordable Care Act, so it refuses to work with the Obama administration in legislating technical fixes that would make the law work more smoothly. Is this in any sense patriotic? Having lost battles over the law in Congress and the Supreme Court, don’t Republicans have an obligation to make it serve their constituents as well as possible?

Both parties used to understand the need to invest in infrastructure for reasons of competitiveness and safety. Both parties used to understand that there could be no serious threat to send the Treasury into default. Both parties used to cheer the kind of good economic news we heard Thursday — 288,000 new jobs in June, unemployment down to 6.1 percent.

But now, one party — the GOP — cares more about ideology, reelection and opposing Obama’s every initiative than about the well-being of the nation. It is scant comfort, on Independence Day, to remember that the republic has survived worse.
weirdvintage:

Fry’s Cocoa—Rich in nerve food!  Advertisement, 1940s (via Vintage-Ads LJ)

weirdvintage:

Fry’s Cocoa—Rich in nerve food!  Advertisement, 1940s (via Vintage-Ads LJ)

grimchild:

Feathered T. rexes are fun to draw.

grimchild:

Feathered T. rexes are fun to draw.

sdzoo:

Owens Aviary is home to over 40 different bird species that are native to Southeast Asia. It truly is a jungle in there. 

kqedscience:

Know What’s In Your Face Wash: Why Illinois Banned Microbeads
“Exfoliating microbeads, which are tiny bits of plastic, in your face wash are causing some serious damage to your skin and environment, and states are starting to crack down.
This month, Illinois banned the sale of cosmetics containing plastic microbeads, becoming the first state to legally take a strong stance against what researchers are calling a serious environmental problem.”
Learn more from timemagazine.

kqedscience:

Know What’s In Your Face Wash: Why Illinois Banned Microbeads

Exfoliating microbeads, which are tiny bits of plastic, in your face wash are causing some serious damage to your skin and environment, and states are starting to crack down.

This month, Illinois banned the sale of cosmetics containing plastic microbeads, becoming the first state to legally take a strong stance against what researchers are calling a serious environmental problem.”

Learn more from timemagazine.

Chapter 24

libutron:

Spotted Dove and the ability to produce ‘milk’ to feed its young
Spilopelia chinensis (Columbiformes - Columbidae), formerly Streptopelia chinensis, is a medium sized dove (30cm), bearing a distinctive black patch with white spots on the back of the neck.  
The Spotted Dove is native to eastern Asia. It was introduced into Australia in the mid-1800s and early 1900s and quickly became established.
The Spotted dove shares with other species of doves and pigeons the fascinating ability to produce crop milk. During breeding season, special glands in the crops of both males and females enlarge and secrete a thick milky substance.
The chicks drink this milk by poking their bills into the parent’s throat. Thus, pigeons and doves can feed their young without having to incessantly hunt or forage for food. Instead of laying many eggs, they lay one or at most two eggs. Their abundance is proof that this feature gives them the advantage.
References: [1] -[2] - [3] - [4]
Photo credit: ©Gary Kinard
Locality: Laem Phak Bia, Thailand

libutron:

Spotted Dove and the ability to produce ‘milk’ to feed its young

Spilopelia chinensis (Columbiformes - Columbidae), formerly Streptopelia chinensis, is a medium sized dove (30cm), bearing a distinctive black patch with white spots on the back of the neck.  

The Spotted Dove is native to eastern Asia. It was introduced into Australia in the mid-1800s and early 1900s and quickly became established.

The Spotted dove shares with other species of doves and pigeons the fascinating ability to produce crop milk. During breeding season, special glands in the crops of both males and females enlarge and secrete a thick milky substance.

The chicks drink this milk by poking their bills into the parent’s throat. Thus, pigeons and doves can feed their young without having to incessantly hunt or forage for food. Instead of laying many eggs, they lay one or at most two eggs. Their abundance is proof that this feature gives them the advantage.

References: [1] -[2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Gary Kinard

Locality: Laem Phak Bia, Thailand

wingedpredators:

Mrs, Steppe Eagle (Photo by Trevor Earl)

wingedpredators:

Mrs, Steppe Eagle (Photo by Trevor Earl)

explore-blog:

Winners of NASA’s 2014 space art contest for K-12 students. Oh, and they are all girls.

Bonus points to fourth grader Emma Krooner, who didn’t win but was the only one to forgo expected depictions of planets, spacesuits, and rockets to celebrate the Curiosity Rover instead. 

Unbeknownst to many, NASA has supported the arts for half a century with its NASA Art Program for adult artists, commissioning such icons as Andy Warhol, Annie Leibovitz, and Norman Rockwell. See more of it here

creatures-alive:

(via 500px / Portrait for the Red Bearded Bee Eater by Richard Lim)